Guerrilla Literacy Learners

This project has been funded with sup-port from the European Commission. The content reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

GENERAL INSPIRATION

 

 

Why Academic Teaching Doesn’t Help Kids Excel In Life

Academics. Most of our current school system revolves around it, and yet, I think it falls miserably short of what our kids need. To be honest, I think our academic system of education is highly overrated, at best. At worst, it destroys a number of our kids. Too often, the focus of our kids’ school day is Content with a capital C, with little connection to why it matters. Instead of learning together, many of our students spend hours filling in worksheets or copying down lecture notes that they could google in 30 seconds.

 

Lizzie Pinard - Learner autonomy

Recorded in February, this webinar looks at the topic of learner autonomy and suggests practical methods that we can use to encourage our learners to move towards being genuinely autonomous outside the classroom.

 

What is Inquiry Based Learning?

This video explains the teaching methodology Inquiry-Based Learning. It was created for the Inspiring Science Education Project as part of a series of videos to promote the use of Inquiry-Based Learning.

 

The Laubach Method

It is a way of teaching that focuses on learning through association rather than rote memory. While it originally began as a program for illiterate adults by teaching people how to read and write in their native language, it has been adapted to serve ESL teaching purposes as well.

 

Why kids need to move, touch and experience to learn

When students use their bodies in the learning process, it can have a big effect, even if it seems silly or unconnected to the learning goal at hand. Researchers have found that when students use their bodies while doing mathematical storytelling (like with word problems, for example), it changes the way they think about math. “We understand language in a richer, fuller way if we can connect it to the actions we perform,” says Sian Beilock, professor of psychology at the University of Chicago. Worth reading!

 

Steven Pinker: 'Many of the alleged rules of writing are actually superstitions'

Though bad writing has always been with us, the rules of correct usage are the smallest part of the problem. Any competent copy editor can turn a passage that is turgid, opaque, and filled with grammatical errors into a passage that is turgid, opaque, and free of grammatical errors. Rules of usage are well worth mastering, but they pale in importance behind principles of clarity, style, coherence, and consideration for the reader...

 

Use those semi-colons carefully, or don't use them at all.

Watch this nice video from the 'Coma Quen'. Traditionally, the semicolon has three uses: it can replace a comma in a series that includes interior commas, such as this one; it can replace a comma and a conjunction in a compound sentence, creating a subtle relationship between clauses; and it can be used artfully to suggest hesitations and inflections.

 

Common irregular verbs

There are a number of common irregular verbs. Here is a short list of the most common irregular verbs that will need to be memorized:

 

TED talk:

Keith Chen might be an economist, but he wants to talk about language.

For instance, he points out, in Chinese, saying “this is my uncle” is not as straightforward as you might think. In Chinese, you have no choice but to encode more information about said uncle.

Chen wondered: Is there a connection between language and how we think and behave? In particular, he wanted to know: does our language affect our economic decisions? So he designed a study to look at how language might affect individual’s ability to save for the future. According to his results, it does — big time.

While “futured languages,” like English, distinguish between the past, present and future, “futureless languages” like Chinese use the same phrasing to describe the events of yesterday, today and tomorrow...

 

25 best websites for learning English

Tips and tricks from an enthusiastic English teacher

 

Welcome to UDLnet

Article 24 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities states that persons with disabilities should be guaranteed the right to inclusive education at all levels, regardless of age, without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunity. State Parties should ensure that children with disabilities are not excluded from free and compulsory primary education, or from secondary education. Still, there is a long way ahead before reaching a society where equal opportunities are guaranteed for all…

 

Multilinguals have multiple Personalities

Between 2001 and 2003, linguists Jean-Marc Dewaele and Aneta Pavlenko asked over a thousand bilinguals whether they “feel like a different person" when they speak different langauges. Nearly two-thirds said they did.

How does that play out in day-to-day speech?

 

How the language you speak changes your view of the world

Bilinguals get all the perks. Better job prospects, a cognitive boost and even protection against dementia. Now new research shows that they can also view the world in different ways depending on the specific language they are operating in. The past 15 years have witnessed an overwhelming amount of research on the bilingual mind, with the majority of the evidence pointing to the tangible advantages of using more than one language. Going back and forth between languages appears to be a kind of brain training...

 

Speaking in Tongues - Thinking Differently on Language Learning

... Now off to your French lesson - avez vous un chat; ferme le fenetre - no that's feminine don't forget the circumflex and the correct pronunciation ends 'tchhrrre'. Sadly for a lot of students that means Zzzzz. Can't wait to see you next week for another half hour…

So what works or could work better with (young) language learners? This article gives an interesting overview.

 

Language transfer

Language transfer refers to speakers or writers applying knowledge from one language to another language. It is the transfer of linguistic features between languages in the speech repertoire of a bilingual or multilingual individual, whether from first to second, second to first or many other relationships. It is most commonly discussed in the context of English language learning and teaching, but it can occur in any situation when someone does not have a native-level command of a language, as when translating into a second language.

 

How to learn 30 languages?

Some people can speak a seemingly impossible number of tongues. How do they manage it, asks David Robson, and what can we learn from them? Speaking extra languages delays dementia by five years or more. Learning a new language as we age is easier than you might assume.

 

Correcting People’s Grammar: Just Don’t Do It

When it comes to grammar correction and education, where is the line between agitating and helping? As grammar lovers, our intentions are often good. We care about language and communication, and we want to make sure people are understood clearly. However, grammar lovers too often overstep the boundaries of appropriate correction.

 

What if everything we thought we knew about learning was wrong?

Reflection on the teaching and learning process. Author tries to answer  the question “How far back can we go with teaching and learning?”

 

Modern tribes: the grammar pedant

‘The abuse of language causes needless anger, hurt and offence. It’s a question of good manners. Did you really just say refute?’

 

Continuing language learning: the role of L1 literacy in secondary L2 language and literacy development

Many secondary second language learners face numerous challenges as they develop language and literacy in a second language at the same time they are learning subject area content in that second language. Fortunately, L1 academic literacy is not separate from L2 academic literacy. They are both manifestations of a common underlying proficiency.

 

How the language you speak changes your view of the world

Bilinguals get all the perks. Better job prospects, a cognitive boost and even protection against dementia. Now new research shows that they can also view the world in different ways depending on the specific language they are operating in.

 

How to really change education — excerpt from Sir Ken Robinson’s new book

 

An example that environment means a lot

 

Libraries Change Lives

How San Francisco reinvented the school cafeteria to create friendly environment

Inspiring movie about the role of libraries

 

The Flipped Classroom Model: A Full Picture

A well illustrated article… Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved. Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved…

 

Reading, eye movement, and the brain

Right now as you are reading the sentences on this page your eyeballs are not moving from left to right, letter-to-letter, word-to-word in a straight, steady line.  If you were able to attach little lasers to your eyeballs you would see that your eyes are actually hovering and jumping about like a hummingbird.  They move unevenly, go back occasionally, skip some words, and fixate on others (Paulson & Goodman, 2008).  These small, rapid, jerky movements that your eyes make are called saccades.   It only appears that you are moving them from left to right in a straight line because your brain is doing what human brains naturally do: they create order out of chaos...

 

What Happens When Students Control Their Own Education?

When a New Hampshire district school found itself struggling with low test scores and high turnover, it made a radical decision: Flip the traditional model and let kids take over the classrooms...

... There have been unexpected developments: When Wellington (a teacher) used a traditional multiple choice test to measure students’ grasp of the content at the end of a subject unit, many of them scored poorly on some of the basic facts of Thoreau’s biography. But their written responses to the essay portion of the test, asking them to explain and interpret transcendentalism, were a different kind of surprise. “They blew me out of the water,” Wellington said. “Their understanding was clearly deeper than just those facts.”...

 

Learning how to learn and fail and learn some more

(Why Academic Teaching Doesn’t Help Kids Excel In Life)

Teacher Shelley Wright questions classic academic teaching. She suggests that school should be a place where kids can discover what they love. They should be able to ask the questions that matter to them and pursue the answers. They should discover what they are passionate about, what truly sets their hearts and souls on fire. They should discover they can make a difference now. Above all, they should leave school knowing what they are good at.

 

 

 

 

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